Individual Projects

 

Recognizing materials over time

Lead Beneficiary:
University of Bradford, UK – Professor Marina Bloj and Dr Andrew Logan

Expected results:
Understanding of how our ability to remember and recognise materials is affected by temporal and dynamic effects such as movement and aging/wear. Identification of the key intrinsic properties (e.g. colour or gloss changes) whose variation drives material recognition over time.


 

Look but don’t touch: Understanding multisensory processing underlying predicted tactile consequences

Lead Beneficiary:
University of Cambridge, UK –  Dr Andrew Welchman and Professor Zoe Kourtzi 

Expected results:
Characterisation of the functional interactions between visual signals and activity in somatosensory cortex. Understanding of the temporal dynamics and causal aspects of these interactions.


 

Spatial and temporal changes of light effects: Effects on perception of material and space

Lead Beneficiary:
TU Delft, Netherlands – Professor Sylvia C. Pont  and Professor Elmar Eisemann

Expected results:
Development and validation of perceptually based interfaces to systematically vary spatial and angular distribution of the light field in real and virtual spaces. Implementation of lighting design tools that work with light field parameters instead of traditional surface illuminances.


 

Perceptual appearance design for product experience

Lead Beneficiary:
TU Delft, Netherlands – Professor Elmar Eisemann and Professor Sylvia C. Pont 

Expected results:
Development of a simple capturing set-up for products which enables their display under virtual dynamic illumination and easy to use interface to support non-expert users in the design of product presentations.


 

Perceptual appearance for virtual dynamic materials

Lead Beneficiary:
Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain – Dr Diego Gutierrez and Dr Belen Masia

Expected results:
Development, implementation and validation of a perceptually-based approach to define material appearance for computer graphics, suitable for rendering and editing and takes into account dynamic aspects of material perception.


 

Perceptual standard for high gloss materials

Lead Beneficiary:
Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Germany – Professor Roland W. Fleming and Professor Karl R. Gegenfurtner

Expected results:
A perceptually based end-to-end standard for measuring and communicating the characteristics (including dynamic aspects) of high gloss materials.


 

Haptic and visual softness perception: Beyond elastically

Lead Beneficiary:
Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Germany – Dr Katja Doerschner-Boyaci and Professor Knut Drewing

Expected results:
Understanding the time course of haptic and visual interactions for softness perception. Identification of the physical characteristics corresponding to perceptions of plasticity (e.g. clay) and their neural correlates.


 

Temporal dynamics of context dependent visual processing

Lead Beneficiary:
Bilkent University, Turkey – Dr Huseyin Boyaci

Expected results:
Identification of the temporal patterns of connectivity and information processing steps (feedforward, feedback, lateral interactions) within and between visual areas in the cortex that underlie contextual influences in visual perception such as contrast effects.


 

Learning to live in a material world: Combining vision and touch

Lead Beneficiary:
Universität Ulm, Germany – Professor Marc O. Ernst

Expected results:
Understanding the factors (associated risk, parameter vs. structural) that affect the time it takes to learn new relationships between haptic and visual cues for manipulating materials.


 

Visual cues to material properties for perception and action

Lead Beneficiary:
University of Southampton, UK   – Professor Wendy Adams

Expected results:
Understanding of how visual and haptic cues interact to influence explicit perceptual and implicit estimates of material properties. Predictions of conditions that will lead to integration or repulsion effects.


 

Dynamic illumination and its effects on material and object perception

Lead Beneficiary:
University of Newcastle, UK – Professor Anya Hurlbert

Expected results:
Understanding the extent to which we are aware of dynamic changes in the colour of lights (illumination spectra). Identification of the effects that spatial configuration and temporal frequency have on our ability to detect changes. Establishment of how these changes affect material perception, object recognition and appreciation.